Vi leser Bookerprisvinneren sammen nå i november!

 

Om en krigsfange på the Burma Railway

Bookerprisvinner 2014

Denne måneden leser vi en av årets høyest premierte romaner, nemlig Bookerprisvinneren, The Narrow Road to the Far North av Richard Flanagan.   Jeg har nettopp begynt på den, så finn den frem og begynn på den nå, du også, så leser vi den sammen!  Så langt har jeg stor glede av den;  den er uventet, vakker og interessant.  Min omtale kan du lese etter hvert her på bloggen.  Nedenfor er beskrivelsen av boken fra Man Bookerprisens hjemmeside;  få med deg diskusjonspørsmålene også, de er spoiler-free.

«The Narrow Road to the Deep North is a love story unfolding over half a century between a doctor and his uncle’s wife.

Taking its title from one of the most famous books in Japanese literature, written by the great haiku poet Basho, Flanagan’s novel has as its heart one of the most infamous episodes of Japanese history, the construction of the Thailand-Burma Death Railway in World War II.

In the despair of a Japanese POW camp on the Death Railway, surgeon Dorrigo Evans is haunted by his love affair with his uncle’s young wife two years earlier. Struggling to save the men under his command from starvation, from cholera, from beatings, he receives a letter that will change his life forever.»

Diskusjonspørsmål:

-What is the significance of the name of the novel, The Narrow Road to the Deep North? Why might Richard Flanagan have chosen to name his book after Basho’s well-known travel narrative by the same name?

-Richard Flanagan describes The Road to the Deep North as ‘a dance in and out of light’. For all its bleakness, is this a novel about hope?

-The Narrow Road to the Deep North examines what is good and bad in a man. Does the novel indicate whether man can choose which side of his nature prevails over the other or is this beyond man’s control?

-Does The Narrow Road to the Deep North ultimately answer the question ‘What is a hero?’ Or is it trying to present a larger idea of humanity that makes the notion of heroism look untrue to what we are as human beings?

-‘But always, for Flanagan, there is the possibility of redemption: in love,
in friendship, in literature (the book’s epigraph is a quote from Paul Celan: “Mother, they write poems”)’. Alex Preston, The Observer. But is there, finally, any redemption for Dorrigo Evans? What is your response to the ending of The Narrow Road to the Deep North?

Da er det bare å lese i vei!

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Jeg kjøpte en signert kopi i London og ble fascinert over den  vakre signaturen til Flanagan. Beautiful!

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